Gargoor, The Surviving Fishing Trap From The Past

Gargoor, The Surviving Fishing Trap From The Past

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There, in a vast land at the end of Fahaheel, the air carries between its aromas, the feel of the sea. The sun is near the sunken, and It’s time for the fishermen to return to their homes.  Before that, you see them gearing up their fishing kits for another day. Thousands of huge fish traps, most of them are neatly set in a way that attracts attention of transients. While the fishermen hang the other traps on their boats, keep walking and you will see two fishermen assembling new fish traps by strong ropes. “All the fish traps are imported from the UAE, unassembled”, one fisherman said. “I’ve been working here for five years on the fish trap assembling. It may look easy, but It takes a lot of tensile strength to ensure it withstand the stampede of fish inside”, he added.

 

 

Fishing with fish traps is banned in some countries.  On the other hands, some governments do not want to wipe out the history of the traditional ways for fishing, which is considered an ancestral heritage.  Therefore, strict conditions were imposed to build it more environmentally friendly, such as, all fish traps must be made of Eco friendly materials. Second, traps should contain small halls to help smaller fish to escape, and finally, fishing should be at a certain distance of shore. The fisherman, Saldoq, told me that he has been operating here for over 15 years. The boat is owned by a Kuwaiti citizen who sells the caught fish at the Fish market of Fahaheel.  “We go fishing twice a week, 15 hours on each daytime. We secrete the fish and return the young to the sea”, he explained.

 

So, what attracts fish to  fall in the caged trap? It’s the ready-to-eat fish placed inside. Nicely cut and salted as if it’s been marinated for a BBQ. And just like those fish, your eyes will be caught by the splendor of the scene.

 

Non-Native Plants in The Dock

Non-Native Plants in The Dock

Fahaheel Cemetery

Fahaheel Cemetery

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